Curriculum

CM Program

Location: RVR Hall 4026
Hours: M - F 9:00AM To 5:00PM 
Phone: 1-(916)-278-6616 

Bachelor of Science in Construction Management (BSCM)

Minor in Business Administration

Major Requirements - '06 - '08 Catalogue
Total units required for Bachelor of Science, Construction Management (BSCM)
132 semester credit hours
Minor in Business Administration

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Current Curriculum Flow Chart
Individual Courses
Link to Articulate Agreements
Link to Catalog Course Descriptions 

A. Required Lower Division Courses (Pre-major)

First Semester Freshman Year (16 units)

(1) MIS 001 - Microcomputer hardware and Systems Software**
(1) MIS 002 - Spreadsheets**
(1) MIS 003 - Word Processing and Presentation Graphics**
(3) CE 9 - Surveying
(3) English 1A - Composition
(3) MATH 26A - Calculus I
(1) CM 10 - The Construction Industry
(3) ECON 1A or 1B - Economics
(3) General Education Course

Second Semester Freshman Year (17 units)

(4) MATH 26B Calculus II*
(4) PHYS 5A - General Physics: Mechanics, Heat, Sound (4)
(3) CM 20 - Construction Materials and Processes
(3) ACCY 1 - Accounting Fundamentals
(3) ENG 20T or ENG 20

First Semester Sophomore Year (16 units)

(3) CM 40 - Properties of Construction Materials
(4) PHYS 5B* - Gen. Phys: Light, Electricity & Magnetism (PHYS 5A)
(3) CM 21 - Construction Graphics (CM 20, mechanical drawing ability)
(3) ACCY 2 - Managerial Accounting (ACCY 1)
(3) General Ed Elective

Second Semester Sophomore Year (18 units)

(3) CM 30 - Engineering Mechanics - Statics (MATH 26B*, PHYS 5A, CM 21)
(3) CM 22 - Construction Documents (CM 10, CM 20, CM 21)
(3) STAT 1* - Introduction to Statistics
(3) Communication Studies 4 (Intro to Public Speaking) or 5 (The Communication Experience)
(3) ENVS 010 - Environmental Sciences
(3) General Ed Elective

*Indicates course can be taken concurrently with CM 30. **Students must demonstrate proficiency and computer literacy prior to taking upper division CM or Business courses. For the degree, students must satisfy all the University's General Education requirements for Construction Management. Students should contact the program office for a complete list of these requirements.  A second year foreign language course (2A or equivalent) may also satisfy 3 units of GE when the course is being taken to comply with the CSUS foreign language requirement. Students should consult with an advisor for exact GE eligibility of these courses. Note: High school chemistry (one year), mechanical drawing (one year), and trigonometry (one-half year) are also required. Students without this high school preparation must take the necessary courses in addition to those listed above.

NOTE: In most CM courses, student must achieve a C- or better grade to avoid repeating the course.

B. Required Upper Division Courses (Major)

Upper division CM courses are open only to students who have satisfactorily completed all required lower division preparation and have been admitted to the major. Lower division prerequisites are noted below only to show the relationship of the subjects.

First Semester Junior Year (18 units)

(3) CM 130 - Structures I - Design Principles and Structural Steel Design (CM 30, CM 40*)
(3) CM 136 - Principles of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering (PHYS 5B, CM 30)
(3) CM 121 - Fundamentals of Construction Estimating (CM 22, CM 120 concurrently)
(3) CM 120 - Construction Operations and Methods Analysis (CM 22, CM121 concurrently)
(3) MGMT 101 - Business Law
(3) MGMT 117 - Business, Ethics & Society - General Education Course

Second Semester Junior Year (18 units)

(3) CM 140 - Structures II-Timber and Formwork Design (CM 130)
(3) CM 135 - Soils and Foundations (CM 130)
(3) CM 125 - Advanced Estimating and Bidding (CM 121)
(3) CM 127 - Planning, Scheduling and Control (CM 120)
(3) CM 111 - Construction Labor Relations

First Semester Senior Year (18 units)

(3) CM 150 - Structures III - Concrete and Masonry (CM 140)
(3) CM 124 - Engineering Construction - (CM 125, CM 135)
(3) CM 126 -  Construction Project Management - (CM 125, 127)
(3) CM 110 - Legal Aspects of Construction - (MGMT 101, CM 22)**
(3) HROB 101 - Organizational Management
(3) General Education Course

Second Semester Senior Year (18 units)

(3) CM 129 - Construction Management (CM 110, 111, 124, 126, HROB 101)
(3) Free BA Elective - A 100-level Business Administration course
(3) Marketing 101, FIN 101, OPM 101
(3) General Education Course
(3) General Education Course*  

* May be taken concurrently with CM 130
**CM majors must take this course concurrently with CM 126

Cooperative Education

Working in industry for a limited number of hours each week is encouraged, but a formal co-op experience, because CM courses are offered just once a year, is not. The Program Coordinator and faculty will help students find employment in industry that will augment their academic experience.

Students are encouraged to participate in the Cooperative Education Program, which provides alternate periods of study at the University and practical work experience in industry or government for pay. Most participants of the Co-Op plan will complete one six-month work period in their junior year and the other in their senior year. Applications for the program are available from the Co-op office. 

BUSINESS MINOR

Listed upper and lower division Business Administration courses apply both to the major and to a Business Administration minor. Students interested in pursuing a pre-MBA sequence should contact the Degree Program Center in the College of Business.

LOWER DIVISION COURSES

10. The Construction Industry - An introduction to the many facets of the construction industry and various career opportunities in construction. The unique products of construction, the organizations involved, and the people that make it happen. Guest speakers. Lecture one hour. Fall only; 1unit.

20. Construction Materials and Processes - An introduction to construction materials; to their properties in-place in completed projects, and to their characteristics that affect construction processes. The organizations, methods, equipment and safety considerations that are common to projects of all types and to all segments of the industry. Field trips. Lecture two hours, laboratory three hours. Spring only; 3 units.

21. Construction Graphics - Instruction and exercises in graphic techniques and procedures applicable to construction. The preparation of conventional drawings in the civil, architectural, structural, mechanical and electrical fields. Freehand sketching. axonometric, multi-view presentations and quantity surveying. Lecture two hours, Laboratory three hours. Prerequisites: CM 20, competence in mechanical drawing. Fall only; 3 units.

22. Construction Documents - Analysis of construction drawings, specifications, bid and contract documents. Technical and legal interpretations and implications to managers of the construction process. Quantity surveying. Lecture two hours, laboratory three hours. Prerequisites: CM 21. Spring only, 3 units.

30. Engineering Mechanics - Statics - An introduction to the solution of engineering design problems. Concepts of units, vectors, equilibrium, forces, force systems, shear and moment diagrams. Lecture three hours. Prerequisites: MATH 26A (may be taken concurrently), PHYS 5A; MATH 26B may be taken concurrently.  Spring only, 3 units.

40. Properties of Construction Materials - A study of the engineering performance characteristics of materials. Covers testing concepts and procedures. Includes basic properties of metals, aggregates, cements, concrete, timber, asphalt, masonry and plastics with emphasis on construction applications. Lecture two hours, laboratory three hours. Prerequisites: CM 20, PHYS 5A.  Spring only, 3 units.

UPPER DIVISION COURSES

110. Legal Aspects of Construction - The application of basic legal concepts to the construction process. Analysis of problems relating to contract formation, administration, and interpretation. Includes bidding and contract enforcement; litigation of disputes vs. arbitration; liability for negligence, warranty, or strict liability; safety; license law requirements; mechanics' liens and stop notices; bond rights and obligations. Lecture three hours. Prerequisite: CM 22, Mgmt 101. Fall only; 3 units.

111. Construction Labor Relations - A study of federal and state labor law; labor unions, and their importance in the construction industry; and employment law. Lecture three hours. Spring only; 3 units.

120. Construction Operations and Methods Analysis - An introduction to the analysis and management of construction projects in terms of the work that must be performed in the construction process. Analysis of operations and methods using concepts and techniques, including video, that are applicable to all types of projects in all segments of the industry. Safety as an integral part of project and operations management. Field trips. Lecture two hours, laboratory three hours. Prerequisite: Corequisite CM 121. Fall only; 3 units.

121. Fundamentals of Construction Estimating - A study of the basic approaches to estimating the cost of all types of construction projects from a managerial viewpoint. Types of estimates and methods; elements of cost, variables and costing concepts; analysis procedures for detailed estimates. Lecture two hours, laboratory three hours. Prerequisite: CM 22. Corequisite: CM 120. Fall only; 3 units.

124. Engineering Construction - A study of civil engineering construction projects with emphasis on equipment-paced operations including safety aspects. Engineering fundamentals and other factors that affect equipment selection and production. Amplification of recording and analysis techniques. Unit price contracts. Field trips. Lecture two hours, laboratory three hours. Prerequisites: CM 125, 135. Fall only; 3 units.

125. Advanced Estimating and Bidding - A study of the concepts and practices involved in the total estimating and bidding process in construction, from initial project selection to submission of final bids. Covers considerations in project selection, variables affecting labor productivity, sub-bid analysis, contingency and risk analysis, pricing concepts, bidding models, and the presentation of proposals to owners. A complete project estimate and bid is prepared by each student. Lecture two hours, laboratory three hours. Prerequisite: CM 121. Spring only; 3 units.

126. Construction Project Management - An introductory class in the study of Project Management as it is used on the larger construction project. Students study how construction contractors manage cost, time, scope, and quality. The theory of Project Management is developed and compared to management of the on-going business enterprise. Matrix and functional organizations are examined within the context of the industrial, commercial and heavy contract construction industries using the principles of the management process. Lecture three hours. Prerequisites: CM 125, 127. Fall only; 3 units.

127. Planning, Scheduling and Control - A study of the concepts used in planning and controlling construction projects. Scheduling techniques including Arrow, PERT, precedence, linear scheduling, bar charts, and time-scaled diagrams are taught; resource leveling and time-cost analysis are included. Manual procedures followed by computer applications. Lecture three hours. Prerequisite: CM 125. Spring only; 3 units.

129. Construction Management - Covers technical, legal, business and human factors (including safety) in the management of construction organizations. The personal and professional development of the construction professional including ethics, stress, physical and mental health are principal focuses.   The construction professional and the industry in relation to the social and physical environments are discussed. Lecture three hours. Prerequisites: CM 110, 111, 124, 126, HROB 101. Spring only; 3 units.

130. Structures I - Design Principles and Structural Steel Design - Introduction to structural design. Consideration of load conditions, stresses, strain, beam deflection and column action. Basic design of structural steel members with emphasis on systems used in practical situations. Beams, trusses, and columns are designed using the Uniform Building Code as a reference and the results are shown on detailed drawings and sketches. Lecture three hours. Prerequisite: CM 30, CM 40*. Fall only; 3 units.

135. Soils and Foundations - A study of the properties and behavior of soils used as materials in construction. Index and physical properties of soils including compaction; permeability, compressibility, and shear strength. Methods of laboratory and field tests. Principles of foundation, pavement, and embankment design and temporary soil support systems for trenches and cuts. Lecture two hours, laboratory three hours. Prerequisite: CM 130. Spring only; 3 units.

136. Principles of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering - Basic principles of thermodynamics with application to heating, ventilating and air conditioning systems. Introduction to electrical circuits and circuit analysis with construction applications. Lecture three hours. Prerequisites: PHYS 5B, CM 30. Fall only; 3 units.

140. Structures II - Timber and Formwork Design - Basic design of structural timber members with emphasis on systems used in practical situations. Beams, trusses, and columns are designed using the Uniform Building Code as a reference and the results are shown on detailed drawings and sketches. Application of engineering principles to satisfy construction requirements that are not designed or shown in typical construction documents. Includes analysis and design of concrete form systems, shoring, falsework, and construction dewatering. Lecture three hours. Prerequisite: CM 130. Spring only; 3 units.

150. Structures III - Concrete and Masonry - Basic design concepts of reinforced concrete and reinforced masonry design. Topics and examples include design of beams, slabs, columns and walls. Students are required to demonstrate drafting ability. Assignments include design and drawings of various structural systems. Lecture three hours. Prerequisite: CM 140. Fall only; 3 units.

195. Fieldwork in Construction Management - Supervised work experience in a professional construction management environment with public agencies or firms in the industry. Prerequisite: approval of petition by the supervising faculty member and department chair. May be repeated for credit. Graded Credit/No Credit. 1-3 units.

195A-D. Fieldwork in Construction Management - Supervised employment in a professional construction management environment. Placement arranged through the College of Engineering and Computer Science. Course requires satisfactory completion of the work assignment and a written report. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Graded Credit/No Credit. 1-12 units.

199. Special Problems - Individual projects or directed reading. Note: open only to students competent to carry on individual work. Admission to this course requires approval of an instructor and the student's advisor. 1-3 units.

* May be take concurently.